Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Episode 2.5 – Tiny House Chat

episode 2

A while ago I did a post on this topic, but this week I released an episode where I go over the article, but then also share how I decided to solve those problems.

The original post is here: See it here

The podcast can be found here: Tweenisode 2.5

Playful and Themed Tiny House Design

269 sq. ft. does not seem the most advantageous space for any sort of theme in design. In fact, it seems barely enough space to eat and sleep. Yet somehow designers and architects like Alan Chu are finding playful and inventive ways to give a fresh and fluid look to small spaces.

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Separating the micro apartment into a 2-story unit the blueprint allows for an open floor plan with the kitchen and living space on the bottom floor. This isn’t at all unlike the basic premise of a tiny house trailer. The similarities continue when moving to the bedroom (and bathroom) which is situated on the second floor and accessible by a spiral metal staircase. This plays in directly to the steadily revisited argument of loft -vs- no loft and steps -vs- ladder arguments in the tiny house community. Chu’s space – named Apt 1211 – also owes much credit to the large window that literally floods the apartment with daylight and natural ambiance. On to the theme of the apartment though.

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The custom cabinetry takes on a look for industrial or warehouse crates which all at once keep the design fluid and organized. The boxes were built from certified wood pine and feature red interiors. Because all storage spaces including those for media, clothing, and kitchen items, all use the storage crate look even though they range in size they keep a continuous look and feel. To top it off the flooring on the second floor is made with reclaimed demolition wood truly incorporating the warehouse aesthetic.

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There are some elements that seem less obvious than others in the apartment. One is the framework itself. The second floor seems to hover and lack a certain amount of traditional framing while the downstairs flooring is cement without any mention of whether or not the apartment is on the ground floor or has additional supports for weight integrity above the downstairs unit.

Perhaps the pièce de résistance of the entire unit though is the absence of hardware on the storage containers. It seems as if doors open using finger holes and hinged doors open just by pulling the door and drawers seem to have a notched out handle, all giving a uniform and clean look.

Your Turn!

  • Do you prefer a mixed cabinet look or do you like the themed approach?
  • Would you build with cabinets that lack traditional hardware?

Via

RVs Or A Tiny House – Tiny House Chat Podcast

 

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Some of you have heard already, but myself and Macy Miller have launched a podcast called Tiny House Chat.  We already have a few episode up and you can listen to it on iTunes through the podcast app or on the website.

Listen to it here: Episode 2 – Tiny Houses vs RVs

 

 

Versatile Storage In The Tiny House

In the past two years tiny house designers and builders have gotten quite clever at their inclusion of storage space. With minimal square feet of actual house space it is important to utilize every possible inch of a home. From toe kicks that reveal drawers and stairs made of foot lockers and drop down baskets and wire shelving to closet inserts that hide your dirty clothes, the tiny house is fast becoming the leader in inventive yet practical storage. Perhaps though no tiny house has quite the aesthetic as well as the extreme functionality of storage space as the 215 square feet Tel Aviv studio apartment designed by Israeli architects Rannan Stern and Shany Tal.

multifunctional overviewThe closet and wall piece are made of white birch (often called blonde wood or utility ply in the states) as is the flooring which is covered in brighter birch tiles. For the record white birch is a renewable resource and induces a welcoming feel by allowing the room to appear larger than it truly is and offering a sort of design ambiguity. As explained by the architects the concept of the store is to house a “varied family and personal collection of 2D pieces dating from the 1940s to today.” The pieces themselves are organized and ordered according to groups, sizes and artistic connections which allowed the architect to design drawers and cabinets specific to its content. Not stopping there different areas were designed and built for showcasing and displaying work, tools, and materials; often considered art by those fascinated in a medium. Several of the smaller compartments can also be removed from the larger units and then placed on a table for ease of access. 

Bed out multifunctional

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An interesting concept presented in the multifunctional design is the use of front paneling as display. It brings to mind a potential tiny house kitchen hack, a “home office” need, an art gallery, and more! It shows the unique ability to transform what would be non-functioning and rather boring panel into a pegboard or storage board.

When fully closed up one still can’t shake the notion that the space is small. The storage quite simply allows for more stuff to be lived with in a tiny house without taking up sacred real estate. Does it encourage the tenants of downsizing, minimalizing, and living responsibly or does it simply aid in the covering up of unneeded housewares?

Whatever the case it offers some great suggestions for storage while still adhering to both a modern and intelligent design.

Your Turn!

  • Is modular or concealing furniture part of your tiny house design?
  • Would you live in a house that “transforms?”

Via

Images Via

 

New Zealand Tiny House

In the winter of 2013 Brett Sutherland of Auckland, New Zealand set about to build a tiny house of his own design on a tandem-axle trailer right in the driveway of his parents home. Start to finish took just five months but with a bit of experience and  a lot of tenacity and dedication Sutherland built one of the most unique, space-saving, tiny house trailers visible on the web today.

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Nicknamed the MV (Mobile Villa) by Sutherland himself the inspiration behind the build was really a practical one. As Brett explains to Bryce Langston in a recent interview, “The biggest thing I was trying to avoid was losing all my money as soon as I touched down and that’s what happens when you pay a rent.” Brett truly wanted an off-the-grid, self-contained home that would allow him to concentrate more on his art than making money. He wanted to do more in life than just survive economically.

At 161 sq.ft. the Mobile Villa cost just $10,185.00 USD to build and features a sitting area, a kitchen, an upstairs sleeping loft, and a small bathroom with shower.

MV layout

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The roof line of the MV is a two-tier shed roof which Sutherland admits was done for airflow purposes in the sleeping loft as the top tier features a crank-out, horizontal window. The slope of the roof also allows for generous rain catchment which further allows Sutherlands pursuits for total off-grid living. The lower tier supports Brett’s two solar panels which then further feed into his electric panel situated just above the toilet area and out of direct sight and hosting a 30-amp solar regulator, battery isolator switch, and switchboard.

Upon walking in the tiny house there is immediately a twin-size day bed to the right offering guests a place to lay their head when visiting as well as a couple of sitting chairs directly across the room for more social moments. Another interesting aspect of the house is the use of what looks like standard plywood with a semi-gloss finish rather than the pine tongue-and-groove more frequently seen in tiny houses. This technique has been used before in several inexpensive yet practical ways such as the Zen Cube Mobile Living Space.

MV Living RoomIt’s what is under the day bed that is perhaps the coolest element as it houses the Flexi Tank water storage bag which is connected directly to the downspout of the gutter on the lower roof tier and holds roughly 100 gallons.

MV Water StorageOther features of Sutherlands tiny house are typical of many tiny houses:

  • 12-volt water pump (which services the sink and shower)
  • Propane cook stove
  • 12-volt outlet(s)
  • Sawdust toilet

Since construction on Sutherland’s Mobile Villa ended he has moved it to a friend’s property in Bethells Beach in Auckland. With the ocean as his front yard, no shortage of palm trees as his neighbor, and plenty of room for friends and guests to come and enjoy a barbeque Sutherland and his MV are perfect testimony to the freedom, mobility, and consciousness that tiny living can bring!

MV Moving

Your Turn!

  • Can you see yourself living tiny at the oceanfront?

 

Via

 

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