Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

3 Tips To Finding Land For A Tiny House

The tiny house movement has made huge strides in the past few years by promoting efficient living spaces and minimalist lifestyles in 400 square feet or less. More homeowners are seeing the benefit in downsizing to lessen environmental impact, save money and eliminate home-related stressors.

Building a small home is generally less complicated than planning and constructing a large home. However, it is more difficult to find appropriately-sized and cost-effective land for micro homes than it is for average-sized homes. Most micro home builders aren’t looking to pay full price for open plots, since tiny homes are more economical to build.

Interested in joining the tiny house movement? Consider these three tips to find appropriate land.

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1. Location, Size and Price

Micro homes can be built anywhere as long as construction follows state building codes. Some states even allow homeowners to build micro homes in their backyards. However, a lot of tiny homeowners don’t have pre-owned properties to use for construction. Use Zillow to find land based on location; just search within a designated city under home type: lots/land.

Search for comparable properties online to determine typical ratios of home square footage to land size.  A home that is 100-400 square feet requires far less property than the average 2,500-square-foot home. Regardless of home size, land sizes vary in price based on location. Typical tiny house proponents stray from city centers, as the land is more expensive and prone to complicated code laws. Further, most tiny homeowners are advocates of eco-friendly lifestyles and therefore prefer more rural locales.

2. Consider Zoning Laws

Tiny home builders may be automatically looking for small plots, but states require a certain amount of land for people to live and build on legally. Review state zoning laws to determine the subdivisions and restrictions in a potential area. Tiny homeowners should examine city documents to understand potential long-term neighborhood development plans prior to purchasing land. Most people don’t want to live next to an interstate or strip mall, and knowing about those types of changes helps weed out bad investments.

3. Find an Experienced Agent

Search for a real estate professional who can aid in a tiny land search. There are agents who specialize in niche markets – tiny homes included. Make sure to check up on an agent’s qualifications before hiring them to ensure they are the best fits for tiny house searches. While these steps won’t guarantee the perfect plot for tiny home construction, they certainly help homeowners get started.

This is a guest post by Jennifer Riner of Zillow

 

Cozy Beach Cabin

Here in North Carolina we are starting to get little tastes of spring, last week we had a few inches of snow and then two days later it was 74 degrees outside!  With the warming of the seasons I can’t but help thinking about the beach, so I thought this would be a neat small house to show you all.  This is actually a rental that you can go stay at, located in the UK, Bembridge, Isle of Wright.

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A Change For The Tiny Life

I know a lot of you have been following us on Facebook, over like_icon_large9,000 of you in fact, but things are changing.  Facebook is now making me pay for the posts to be seen by you all, even though you said you wanted to see those posts by liking our page.  We crunched the numbers and now for you all to see the posts like you did 1 year ago, Facebook wants to charge us $375,000 a year!

Other tiny house blogs are getting hit as well, some even harder, one has even announced they are going to have to stop posting to Facebook all together.

So obviously I don’t have a third of a Million dollars, so its time to change things up.  Here is how we are going to make sure we stay in touch with you all from now on: We are going shift our focus to our newsletter.

Our newsletter is free and comes out once a week.  Its short emails with awesome info about tiny houses and most of the stuff on the newsletter isn’t anywhere else because we want those who subscribe to benefit directly.   At first I wasn’t sure what people would think, but now I get about 50 emails a day telling me how much they love it, so we’ve decided to go all in with our newsletter.

Also when you sign up you get our:

  • 5 Secrets Building Inspectors Don’t Want You To Know
  • The Ultimate Building Checklist
  • Planning Guide To Building Your House.

We still will be posting to our website of course and some of it will be shared on Facebook for the time being, but now we are going to be doubling our output with the newsletter.

So I wanted to let you all know about all of this and hopefully you’ll join us on the newsletter :)


Tiny House Wood Panel Walls

I am beginning to move into the inside of my tiny house, to insulate and to put up the pine paneling.  A little bit ago I put up some of the pine paneling on the interior wall for what will become the back of the closet.  I had wanted to get back to the tiny house to keep putting up the walls, but some work pulled me away and then it rained, a lot.

The result was the wood paneling swelled up as it absorbed the moisture in the air.  Before anyone ask, yes I did have the wood sitting out in the space to normalize, but with so much rain and the house not being climate controlled yet, the moisture did its damage.  This also happened before I could seal the panels, so that didn’t help either.

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You can see the wood had swelled so much that it tore itself free from the nails and bowed out majorly.

I guess the value of my mistake is to prevent this from happening to others.  I just did a little wall when this happened.  Imagine if this were to happen when someone just finished the entire inside!  So how do I plan to prevent this from happening again?

  1. I’m going to make a concerted effort once I start to not stop until I’m mostly done with the main wall panelings.
  2. I’m going to choose a week where the weather should have a pretty even moisture level in the air
  3. As soon as I get the wall paneling up, I’m going to start sealing it right away.  I’ll be trying Tung Oil
  4. I built a insulated temporary door which has weather stripping on it

The temporary door I built is pretty overbuilt honestly, but I figured if I was going to have a temporary door, I might as well do it right and honestly it only took me an hour.  Now if I was building a tiny house inside or if the weather where I lived was even keeled, then this wouldn’t be an issue.  In the past week here in Charlotte it has been dry-ish and 73 degrees and then three days later we had snow where it was 20 degrees.  Its a nightmare for this type of stuff.

For the door I made a frame that fit inside my door frame and then attached a cheap piece of OSB board.  The 2×4′s were $2.30 each (3) the OSB was $7 (1)  Insulation was about $7 worth from a larger pack I’ll be using for the walls.   So $20.90 for the door total.

Now many of you might be asking why I don’t just put on my regular door right now.  The reason for this temporary door is that I decided to put the floor in near the very end of the build so I don’t scratch it.  Since I decided that, I’m still feeling out what the actual final height of floor will be, I don’t know exactly know how low the door must hang.  The door is made, but I want to put the floor in, add the threshold, then adjust the door height and hang it.

Here is the temporary door I made:

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photo 2In the above photo you’ll notice that the OSB actually extends beyond the frame, this was intentional.  I push this into the door frame and the extra OSB gives me a lip and something to mount the weather stripping to.

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On the bottom of the temporary door I had the OSB go flush so that when I move it around the brunt of the force is on the 2×4′s and not on the OSB.  This is  because OSB is pretty fragile and it can break down.

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Have A Tiny House Question?

Have a tiny house question that you’ve been dying to get answered?

I have setup a new page that lets you do just that, ask your questions!

You’ll need a microphone on your computer, because we are taking the audio of our readers asking their questions and then answering them in a videos to come!  It works almost like leaving me a voice-mail, but its through the computer.

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You can check it out and ask your questions here: http://thetinylife.com/ask-the-tiny-life

 

 

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