Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Tiny House Bike Trailers

Camper-Bike-On-the-Move-600x398How can tiny houses get any better? By attaching them to bikes of course! I love these designs and the mobility without the petrol dependency is right up my alley. Also check out this awesome bike trailer design posted by Ryan. My question is: could I actually tow one of these and live out of it? Not sure but it’d be fun to find out!

Last summer when Cedric and I bike toured we were living out of a tent. After three months I could have really used one of these! It’s probably not the most versatile way to travel by bike but it would sure get a lot of attention. I’m really interested in the extreme ways that people are solving housing issues and creatively using small spaces. I think these bike trailers are such an exceptional example of human ingenuity. I’m continually trying to live a less petrol based lifestyle and while having a tiny house definitely moves me in that direction, this would be the maximum form of commitment!  Plus, if I am having a hard time living in 98 sq. feet, how hard would it be to downsize further! A real bike newThese bike pulled tiny spaces are certainly an extreme in the small space revolution but the impact on society could be huge! At the very least it might be able to provide housing to a growing population who don’t have the means to build a tiny house and pull such a structure but most everyone can get a hold of a bike. Although, to call this “housing” may be stretching things a bit. Shelter may be more apt!

I think it’d be great if bicycle cooperatives and shops could start assisting with constructing spaces such as these. There’s definitely a marketable perspective to such structures as well, for example, with travelers of the two-wheeled variety. I could see some bike enthusiasts wanting to take on the challenge of travel with such equipment. I don’t think it would be easy and you would be limited to terrain you could tackle with such a load but it just makes me itch to take a winter cruise through Florida with one of these rigs! I’d definitely have to stick to flat lands but it would be good fun and it would sure beat a tent! The slow traveler in me feels drawn to the people power of such a set-up plus the attention you’d get traveling with this would be great entertainment. Pretty much the best collision of bicycles and tiny living ever!

 Your Turn!

  • Would you consider living such a tiny life?

Via

Book Nooks For Small Spaces

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15 book nooks for small spaces or your tiny house aka reading nooks

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Annoucement Of Risk And Liability Statement

Please see our new Risk And Liability Statement  here

Update To Our Comment Policy

Hello all!

I wanted to make a note about an update to our comment policy which marks a significant change to how we handle comments.

The change comes after me noticing that some comments shared information/advice that if followed could result in someone getting hurt because of it.  This mainly surrounds advice on construction and building of tiny houses in a way that could be dangerous.  As I have learned a lot more about building tiny houses after doing it myself, being involved with tiny houses for years, etc I have learned to see where cutting corners or not doing certain things could put people in harm’s way.

To be honest, there is a good amount of subjectivity when it comes to this, but I try to be judicial about this and I don’t like doing it, but I see it as necessary to keep people safe.

On the flip side of this is that you will see others or myself discussing or debating different approaches, strategies, tools or techniques.  One thing you will learn is that when building a tiny house, there comes a point where even seasons professionals (I don’t mean to say I am one) will disagree on the best practice.  There are some things that are clear cut, but other things we can have lively debates.

We debate on various things where both sides may produce a great end product that is safe and sturdy, but how you get there will differ.  I am one that like to know THE single right answer, but the truth is that there is no such thing in many cases when it comes to the nuances of building.

A few things that I will specifically look for that could lead me to remove a comment due to safety concerns:

Unsafe advice on:

  • Trailer to house anchoring connections
  • Egress
  • Electrical or Gas connections
  • Structural integrity issues

You can find our comment policy at:  http://www.thetinylife.com/about-us/comment-policy/

The Golden Elephant

I’m back in Charleston for the month visiting friends and family and recently went to visit my friend Zach at The Golden Elephant! No, it’s not an Indian restaurant it’s his tiny house! He’s about half-way through his build and I was really curious to see the progress in person and talk about his approach to building a tiny house. Here are some of his insights!

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What inspired you to build a tiny house?

I was originally inspired by the shed that Cedric re-modeled in to a living space in the backyard at our apartment. It was the perfect set-up. I was attracted to the minimalism of the lifestyle as well. Plus, all the resources and time to do it were there.

What freedoms do you hope to attain living the tiny life?

Time, I want my time back. Time and flexibility in life. I feel like you have to pay that ahead though. Truthfully, I don’t want to work as much. I also really appreciate the mobility the lifestyle offers.

Why is it called The Golden Elephant?

Cedric and I were hanging out at the house and we were discussing names at one point. We got to work and then he turned to me and said it was going to be called the golden elephant.  I think the name fits. The cantilever of the house looks like a big trunk. It’s one of the largest tiny houses I’ve seen so far and the outside of the house is a golden color from the cypress.

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How has community impacted your build?

I’ve met so many awesome people through this thing and it’s made me form stronger bonds to my community. It would not be possible without my friends. You can’t really do it without help from your community unless you have that skill set already. Building I had help with the sheathing, siding and installation of the roof.  I have had help figuring out where systems are going to go, talking about ideas and how I’m going to approach these things. A lot of help has come through talking to people who have done things like this before and going over what I plan to do.

What are your methods for getting rid of stuff?

The formula that I’ve adopted is if it’s not serving a purpose or I haven’t used it in 30 days, I try to get rid of it. The exception to this is tools and camping gear because you’re not going to use them all the time but it’s difficult and expensive to replace those things. At minimum, I do four major purges a year. I will take full inventory and clean everything that I own. I will touch everything that I own in my house and if it doesn’t serve a purpose or I don’t need to own it, it’s gone. That’s what keeps me sane because I don’t need to own any more of this stuff. I’ve never been let down by not hanging on and you just have to really decide what you can and can’t live with.

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